Flattening Publisher 2007 bullet points for publication


T

TheBoatJumble

Hi,
I have just sent a book created in publisher 2007 to the printers. They are
having problems due to transparencies, that I to me don't seem to be there on
the bullet points. The problem is when I create the pdf file for publication
Publisher does not show up the transparencies being there and therefore does
not allow me to fix them.
How can I flatten the publication before sending it to the the book publisher?
Thanks
All the best
Dave
 
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M

Mary Sauer

Not sure I know what you mean. Did you create the bullet points and now they
have lost their transparent background?
 
T

TheBoatJumble

Hi Mary,

This is what the publishers said.
"Pre press have checked the cover and text files and come up with a few
problems.

- The text has lots of transparencies. These will need to be flattened out."

When I spoke to them they sai there were 1942 transparencies and these were
the bullet points each of which was a transparency and they could not use the
pdf files with the transparencies because their printer would reject it.

They did not understand why they were. I didn't either because Publisher was
not highlighting them as transparencies.

Dave
 
T

TheBoatJumble

Hi Matt,
Thank you for the offer. Is there anyway I can fix it as I have more books I
am writing and I would like to avoid this problem in the future?

Dave
 
M

Matt Beals

The best way is print to a PostScript file and then use Acrobat
Distiller to "normalize" the PostScript into a PDF. The problem with
that though is that you have to Acrobat Professional. Really what should
be happening is you leave everything RGB and *WITH* transparency in the
PDF. Your print provider, assuming they know what they are doing (I
really mean "know what they are doing") should be easily able to convert
to CMYK, trap the PDF, flatten the art and then print it. The order of
operation is exactly that; Convert to CMYK -> Trap -> Flatten
transparency -> RIP -> Screen -> Plate -> Print -> Ship -> Bill you.

You providing RGB (or spot) color = Good
You leaving Transparency live/native = Good

You converting to CMYK from Publisher = crime against color
You flattening transparency = crime against best practices in printing

Can you do it, yes. Should you, no. Without getting into all the
technical mumbo jumbo here's the short of it. Leaving colors as RGB
allows your print provider to give you the best possible color from
their output device. They know this; they just don't want the hassle of
you saying "but that's not the blue I wanted". Well, if they're
communicating and working *with* you then this really isn't a problem.
The second piece, transparency, is a bit more difficult. By keeping
transparent objects transparent when you send the art to your printer
you are giving them the best possible chance to trap your art correctly.
It may not sound like much, but this is huge. The downside is if they
printer doesn't know what the heck to do with the transparency in terms
of trapping you're in a whole world of hurt.

If you really want to get the best price and the best quality product
you need to call Printing For Less.com and ask for Kent Baker. Tell Kent
that I sent you. If you don't get Kent Baker, tell the operator(s) that
I sent you. These guys know exactly how to handle Publisher and get you
a top notch printed product for a very reasonable price.
Hi Matt,
Thank you for the offer. Is there anyway I can fix it as I have more books I
am writing and I would like to avoid this problem in the future?

Dave
--

Matt Beals
Consultant
Callas Partner/Trainer
Enfocus Certified Trainer
Markzware Recognized Trainer
(206) 618-2537 - Mobile
mailto:[email protected]

Come visit me at:
http://www.automatetheworkflow.com
http://www.mattbeals.com
http://blog.mattbeals.com

Friends don't let friends write HTML email
 
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E

Elmo P. Shagnasty

Matt Beals said:
The best way is print to a PostScript file and then use Acrobat
Distiller to "normalize" the PostScript into a PDF. The problem with
that though is that you have to Acrobat Professional.
Or he could drop it onto Adobe's online system and get a PDF back, or
PrimoPDF's online system and get a PDF back...free of charge, both of
them...


btw, Distiller *distills* the Postscript code into a PDF. Adobe
Normalizer normalizes. In both cases the end result is a PDF, but they
are way different products.
 

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