Navigation Pane in Access 2002

Discussion in 'Access General' started by Ixtreme, May 30, 2013.

  1. Ixtreme

    Ixtreme Guest

    I have an Access 2002 database with different forms. I would like to create a main form with, on the left side, buttons for each form I have.
    If the user clicks on one of these buttons, the associated form should open on the right side of the main form. The buttons should remain visible all the time. I know this can be done in the newer versions of Access but is it also possible in 2002?
     
    Ixtreme, May 30, 2013
    #1
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  2. It's possible, but you'd have to add each button yourself, and associate
    code with each to have it open a form. Much easier might be to have a list
    box or combo box containing the names of each form, and put code in the
    AfterUpdate event to open the selected form.

    "Ixtreme" wrote in message

    I have an Access 2002 database with different forms. I would like to create
    a main form with, on the left side, buttons for each form I have.
    If the user clicks on one of these buttons, the associated form should open
    on the right side of the main form. The buttons should remain visible all
    the time. I know this can be done in the newer versions of Access but is it
    also possible in 2002?
     
    Douglas J Steele, May 30, 2013
    #2
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  3. Ixtreme

    Ixtreme Guest

    Hi Douglas,

    Not exactly what I want. I want the left side of my 'main' form to always displays 5 buttons. If I click button 1, it should open form A on the same 'main' form next to the buttons. If I click button 2, form A should change into form B etc.
     
    Ixtreme, Jun 6, 2013
    #3
  4. Ixtreme

    Gloops Guest

    Ixtreme wrote, on 06/06/2013 16:20 :
    Hello,

    These are subforms.
     
    Gloops, Jun 6, 2013
    #4
  5. Yes, on the right side you place a Subform Control and in code on the Click
    event of each Command Button, you use VBA code or a Macro to change the
    Source Object property of the Subform Control (and the Link Child Fields and
    Link Master Fields, if needed).
     
    Access Developer, Jun 6, 2013
    #5
  6. Ixtreme

    Ixtreme Guest

    Thanks, I'll give it a try!
     
    Ixtreme, Jun 7, 2013
    #6
  7. Ixtreme

    Gloops Guest

    Access Developer a écrit, le 06/06/2013 18:20 :
    It can be easier to create a (hidden) subform for each part, and make it
    visible when clicking on the relevant button.

    Just verify the resource consumption.
     
    Gloops, Jun 7, 2013
    #7
  8. Ixtreme

    Gloops Guest

    Gloops wrote, on 06/06/2013 16:38 :
    The subforms have an advantage : they already existed in version 97 :)

    On more recent versions, you also have controls that present a
    collection of tabs, functionally exactly what you want to do, even if
    the aspect is a little different.
    I think I forgot the name of that type of control, but the picture on
    the toolbar should help you find it ...

    --
     
    Gloops, Jun 7, 2013
    #8
  9. I'm cautious about designing and implementing a particular solution based on
    an assumption of efficiency -- either approach will work, but I'd think
    testing would be needed to determine if either approach was more efficient
    than the other, and whether the difference in efficiency is enough to
    matter.

    Remember the hype about creating "lightweight" forms with no module because
    they would load faster? The then-editor of Access Advisor tested a form with
    no module and the same form with the largest module possible, and found the
    "lightweight" form did load faster, by a massive 15 milliseconds (not
    discernable to someone sitting at the keyboard waiting for the form to
    open). Several "highly knowledgeable Access gurus" were very embarrassed --
    they had drunk the Redmond Kool-Aid without verifying the claims and had
    been strongly suggesting lightweight forms.

    --
    Larry Linson
    Microsoft Office Access MVP
    Co-Author, Microsoft Access Small Business Solutions, Wiley 2010

    Access Developer a écrit, le 06/06/2013 18:20 :
    It can be easier to create a (hidden) subform for each part, and make it
    visible when clicking on the relevant button.

    Just verify the resource consumption.
     
    Access Developer, Jun 8, 2013
    #9
  10. Ixtreme

    Gloops Guest

    So, if you prefer, do spend a lot of time to develop a unique sub-form
    that will be populated dynamically when clicking on a button. You will
    spend much more time than by providing a sub-form by type of treatment,
    but, maybe, you will gain somewhat in loading time ...

    If you do develop both solutions, please report the results in terms of
    difference of efficiency.
    _______________________________________________
    Access Developer wrote, on 08th June 2013 08:00 :
     
    Gloops, Jun 8, 2013
    #10
  11. What are you talking about? Both of us suggested separate Forms for each
    button... at least I think you did... and only differed in how to activate
    the one that's selected. I suggested setting the Source Object (and
    possibly Link Child Fields and Link Master Fields) for a single Subform
    Control on the main Form; you suggested placing the multiple Subform
    Controls on the main Form and hiding/unhiding them.

    Just in case it's not clear to some reading this: there is no "subform
    object" in Access; there is a Subform Control which can display a Form or
    datasheet view; it's only a shortcut in terminology to talk about "a
    subform".

    Changing the Source Object property of a Subform Control populates the
    Subform Control with the Form you specify in the Source Object property.

    In answer to your question: No, I prefer to implement what is easier or
    "seems better" to implement, and worry about performance only if it turns
    out to be a problem.

    Whatever did I write that would make you think I suggested a "generic
    subform" to fit the data for possible options in an application?
     
    Access Developer, Jun 8, 2013
    #11
  12. Ixtreme

    Gloops Guest

    Oh yes, you are right.

    I mixed up source of a subform control with source of the associated
    form. It is even probable what you say takes less lines of code to
    implement, and less memory too.

    Sorry.
    _______________________________________________
    Access Developer wrote, on 08th June 2013 20:51 :
     
    Gloops, Jun 9, 2013
    #12
  13. No problem... in fact, it is always helpful to others who are reading to see
    multiple viewpoints and discussion about approaches and techniques. Thanks
    for participating and helping keep our "zombie" newsgroup shuffling along; I
    keep on answering not only because I'm paying back many people who helped me
    over a lot of years, but because, in the process, I keep learning and
    refreshing my memory.
     
    Access Developer, Jun 9, 2013
    #13
  14. Ixtreme

    Gloops Guest

    Access Developer wrote, on 09th June 2013 22:01 :
    and ... so did I.
     
    Gloops, Jun 9, 2013
    #14
  15. In fact, I've successfully used the approach you described more than once...
    but, now, I'd more likely try what I described.
     
    Access Developer, Jun 9, 2013
    #15
  16. Ixtreme

    HiTechCoach

    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    There is a working framework you can use to get started: Search the utteraccess[dot]com Access Code Archive for "Explorer Bar - Non ActiveX" by tinygiant.

    Sorry I can't post a link at this time.

    Boyd Trimmell, Microsoft Access MVP
    aka HiTechCoach
     
    HiTechCoach, Jun 10, 2013
    #16
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