UNC path network performance


J

Jim Franklin

Hi,

I am writing a small app which distributes an Access database around various
computers on a network for one of my clients.

The app is a standard Front End / Back End Access setup. One of the
computers that the Front End is installed on also stores the Back End.

My question is this: if I re-link the tables on this one machine, using the
full UNC path, does this slow the application down compared to if I re-link
it using a C:\ drive address.

For example (the computer name is Till)
\\Till\MyProgram\xxx_BE.mdb

or

C:\MyProgram\xxx_BE.mdb

Any help would be very much appreciated!

Thanks,
Jim
 
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J

John W. Vinson

Hi,

I am writing a small app which distributes an Access database around various
computers on a network for one of my clients.

The app is a standard Front End / Back End Access setup. One of the
computers that the Front End is installed on also stores the Back End.

My question is this: if I re-link the tables on this one machine, using the
full UNC path, does this slow the application down compared to if I re-link
it using a C:\ drive address.

For example (the computer name is Till)
\\Till\MyProgram\xxx_BE.mdb

or

C:\MyProgram\xxx_BE.mdb

Any help would be very much appreciated!

Thanks,
Jim

That's going to depend a lot on your network: hardware, architecture, network
traffic, the NICs on the machines involved. I would expect the network link to
be slower, but it might be anything from a dramatic and annoying drag, to
something you'ld need careful timing to even detect.

Just try it and see. You can always relink if you don't like it!

The one advantage to using the network link is that it applies to everyone:
all the frontends can have the same link, and you won't need to maintain a
separate version (or manually relink) this one machine.
--

John W. Vinson [MVP]
Microsoft's replacements for these newsgroups:
http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/accessdev/
http://social.answers.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/addbuz/
and see also http://www.utteraccess.com
 

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