Show Hidden Objects Macro

Discussion in 'Access Macros' started by ND Pard, Jun 1, 2010.

  1. ND Pard

    ND Pard Guest

    Can someone walk me through the steps to create a macro that will Show Hidden
    Objects.

    I can do it in VBA code: Application.SetOption "Show Hidden Objects", True

    but I want to create an AutoExe macro to display hidden objects in one of my
    databases.

    Thanks in advance.
     
    ND Pard, Jun 1, 2010
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. ND Pard

    Jeff Boyce Guest

    How come? Unlike Word or Excel, Access is something of a power tool you'd
    use to develop an application. Users don't normally understand
    normalization (Access/relational database), so there's little call for a
    feature that would make hidden objects visible.

    Or is this just for your personal/development use?

    Regards

    Jeff Boyce
    Microsoft Access MVP

    --
    Disclaimer: This author may have received products and services mentioned
    in this post. Mention and/or description of a product or service herein
    does not constitute endorsement thereof.

    Any code or pseudocode included in this post is offered "as is", with no
    guarantee as to suitability.

    You can thank the FTC of the USA for making this disclaimer
    possible/necessary.
     
    Jeff Boyce, Jun 2, 2010
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. ND Pard

    ND Pard Guest

    I have previously distributed a secure database which includes some hidden
    tables.

    These distributed databases reside on the many different users C drive at
    multiple locations through out the state, under their Program Files folder.

    One of the hidden tables needs updating. My intent was to create a
    non-secure database that will contain only the updated hidden table. It
    would be a small database, that when opened would show the hidden table. I
    will provide simple instructions for the users on how to export the table
    (which will display the table, although dimmed, because the Show Hidden
    Objects will be True). I plan to place the database on a network drive that
    they can all access (open) when they click on an email link.

    Thanks to another site, it was suggested I write a function that would show
    the hidden objects and then call that function via the runcode macro feature
    naming the macro AutoExe. This idea worked GREAT!

    Function Show_Hidden_Objects()
    Application.SetOption "Show Hidden Objects", True
    End Function

    In the macro the "Action" used was "RunCode" and the "Function Name" was
    "Show_Hidden_Objects()".

    When the database opens, by default it displays "tables". For most of my
    users it is very unlikely they will change the setting to display the hidden
    (dimmed) macro or module.
     
    ND Pard, Jun 3, 2010
    #3
  4. ND Pard

    Jeff Boyce Guest

    I may not be understanding your situation fully ...

    If you are considering placing the database on a shared (network) drive, why
    not put the database (the whole thing) on that shared network drive? That
    way, you could do whatever updating you need to (in that table, on the
    shared network drive), and the users would NEVER have to update their
    copy...

    What am I missing?

    Regards

    Jeff Boyce
    Microsoft Access MVP

    --
    Disclaimer: This author may have received products and services mentioned
    in this post. Mention and/or description of a product or service herein
    does not constitute endorsement thereof.

    Any code or pseudocode included in this post is offered "as is", with no
    guarantee as to suitability.

    You can thank the FTC of the USA for making this disclaimer
    possible/necessary.
     
    Jeff Boyce, Jun 3, 2010
    #4
  5. ND Pard

    ND Pard Guest

    Well, for one thing, our state-wide network drives are extremely slow so
    rather than tap into just one database, they use their database to extract
    data from the network only when they need updates ... for some, this is
    daily, for some weekly, and some monthly. Yet they all use their respective
    databases regularly; most use it for data prior to the beginning of the
    current month.
     
    ND Pard, Jun 3, 2010
    #5
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.